Message Board

MESSAGE BOARD

Dear LTS Community,

In addition to planning daily lessons for our students, the faculty are preparing our International Baccalaureate(IB) program review and our ten-year accreditation review.  We need some dedicated time to work as a group to complete  some of the tasks.  

To make this happen, on Monday, November 1, 2021, the faculty will be on campus all day working on the IB program review, vertical curriculum alignment, and assessment practices.

Students will enjoy a Head’s Holiday on Monday, November 1. There will be no classes or co-curricular activities. If you would like to drop your child off for the day due to work commitments or other constraints, there will be supervised study hall throughout the day.  We will provide students with a snack and they should bring lunch.  With regrets, there will be no bus transportation. Please let Paula (pallen@longtrailschool.org) know if you will be dropping your child off on Monday, November 1.

We appreciate all of your support.  This work is vital to continuing to deliver high-quality academic programming.  

Sincerely,

Mary Ellen

Dear 6th & 7th Grade LTS Families,

As October ends, our middle school students will be going on a field trip to celebrate autumn. We will be taking students in grades 6 & 7 on a hike to the Freedley Quarry to share Halloween-themed stories written in Language Arts class. We will also be observing the unique features of the quarry as they explore a relic of our area’s mining history and learn about its geologic features.

To maximize the student experience on this trip, it will take place over three days (October 27-29) with groups of around 28 students venturing to the quarry on one of these three  days. When not on the off-campus portion of the trip, students will engage in various STEM challenges and celebrate the fall with movies and crafts.

Students will learn which day they are going to the quarry on Monday, October 25. On their “quarry day”, students will need to bring a packed lunch and proper clothing, including a rain jacket, sturdy shoes and warm layers. They should also pack at least one water bottle. Students will still be attending their world language and arts elective classes and should bring appropriate academic materials.

If you have any questions, please contact me at sdempsey@longtrailschool.org

Sincerely,

Sean, Renee, John, Josh & Kate

CELEBRATE LONG TRAIL SCHOOL DAY – Friday, October 15, 2021

Students, faculty, parents, trustees, alumni and community members are invited to join together in the values of the school to beautify our campus, to play games, do arts and crafts and have fun, and to share a meal. There will be no academic classes; we will focus our attention on embracing the family atmosphere which is so valued and unique to LTS.

As a school family, we will recommit to our Core Values of Integrity, Kindness of Spirit, Openness, Social Responsibility, and Stewardship.

SCHEDULE

  • 8:00-8:30 Advisory
  • 8:35-9:00 Morning Meeting (Dismiss by work groups)
  • 9:00-10:15 Stewardship – Community members are invited to arrive at this time. Wear sturdy shoes, and clothing that you don’t mind getting dirty.
  • 10:15-12:15 Activities/Stewardship/Lunch Rotation

Please note: Anyone 12 and over must show proof of vaccination.  Masks must be worn in the building and are optional for outdoor activities.

Long Trail is offering a flu vaccination clinic for students and faculty at LTS on Wed., Oct. 20 and Wed., Oct. 27 (DATE CHANGE 10/12) from 8:30 am – 2:00 pm. Forms (see links below) need to be completed by a parent/guardian and turned in along with photocopies of the guarantor’s photo ID and insurance card. Students must bring all forms to their appointment as completed documentation is required prior to vaccination. The expense will first be submitted to your insurance; if it is not covered by your insurance, October is Free Flu Shot Month so other resources will be used to cover costs. Please contact School Nurse Stephenie Frawley with questions.

LINKS:
Registration Form
FLU Vaccine Information
Time slot sign up

To: Parents of 10th and 11th Graders,

Your child will be taking the Preliminary SAT (PSAT)/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (NMSQT) on Tuesday, Oct. 26.  This is essentially a “practice” SAT.  Scores may be used by scholarship programs but they are not sent directly  to colleges. Students should bring a calculator with backup batteries and at least two #2 pencils (not mechanical pencils).  They will take the exam from 8:15 am to approximately 12:30 pm.  Students should get a good night’s rest, eat a healthy breakfast before coming to school, and bring a bag lunch.  They will attend afternoon classes once they have finished testing and have eaten lunch. Scores will arrive around the third week in December.   We will then host an event to explain and better understand those scores.

As soon as they arrive, booklets will be distributed to students that both explain the test’s content and provide a full practice test.   Students can also find online practice opportunities with Khan Academy

The fee is $18 if paid by October 18 and $20 if paid after that date.  If you feel that this fee presents a financial burden, please contact the Office of College Counseling to see if you may qualify for a test fee waiver.

The test fee can be paid to Long Trail School with cash/check, Venmo, credit card (4% fee), or charged to your child’s Educate Lunch/School Store account.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Best of luck,

Scott Magrath

Director of College and Career Counseling

Dear LTS Family,

I am writing to inform you that John Moser has stepped down from his position as Chair of the LTS Board of Trustees.

Although we are at a challenging juncture, nevertheless the trustees and I are committed to ongoing conversations with faculty, staff, and all of our constituents because we believe in our mission and core values.

We thank John for his selfless service to Long Trail School with gratitude.

 

In health,

/s/ Seth Linfield

Head of School

To the Long Trail School Skiing and Riding Community,

We are excited to share some great news and updates from Bromley Mountain. Most importantly, JISP, Bromley’s instructional program, is back for 2022!  Please see the details below on the different pass options for high school and middle school students for the 2021-22 winter season.

Students in Grades 9-12: High school students may purchase Bromley’s Student season passes. Students can choose between a Full or Afternoon (12:30 pm-close) pass that is valid daily, including holidays. The priority deadline for this discounted pass is October 15. For rates and sign up information, click here.

Students in Grades 6-8: Middle school students will have two choices for passes.

  • To get the most skiing and riding days, they may purchase the discounted full season (afternoon or full day) pass by October 15. This pass is valid daily, including holidays.  For rates and sign up information, click here.
  • Middle school students also have the JISP option.  JISP provides two hours of lessons and then one hour of free skiing or riding each Friday. For more information about JISP,  go to https://bromleyoutingclub.sportngin.com/register/form/609215997 

2022 JISP Information
Friday is Long Trail’s JISP day.  The program will run on Fridays from January 7 to March 11, 2022.  There is no JISP on February 18 and 25. There are no makeup days if JISP is canceled due to weather or other circumstances. Finally, there will also be a handful of Sundays where the JISP pass will be valid at Bromley or Stratton. The dates are to be determined.

  • New this year – Snow Days!!! When school is cancelled due to a snow day, students may use their pass to ski or board independently on their scheduled program day of the week.  There will be no programs or lessons if school is cancelled.
  • Transportation: Long Trail anticipates having a bus to bring JISP students to Bromley on Fridays.  Long Trail skiers and riders who are not in JISP may also take the bus if there is space available.  There is no bus back from Bromley and all students will need to arrange their own transportation home on Fridays.
  • Student Conduct for JISP: Lift access will be denied if you are not with your group during class times. All participants must take instruction each week. Participants must conduct themselves properly and safely at all times while on the mountain property. The staff reserves the right to suspend any student, driver or instructor from the program for misconduct.
  • Passes: Photos and Pick Up Dates at the Bromley Ticket Office: If you have a photo on file from last year, you may choose to use last season’s photo. Your pass will  be sent to your school through your town chair, Scott Magrath. You will receive a NEW pass – please do not use last year’s pass. If you do not have a photo on file, have not had a pass in the past, or never been in KAP or JISP, passes are available for pickup during the times below. NO JISP Pass Cards Issued after December 1 on Saturdays. There is a $10  replacement fee for lost Pass Cards at Bromley Customer Service.
    • November 8-12 from 1 pm – 5 pm.
    • November 15–24 Mon – Fri from 1pm – 5 pm, Sat & Sun from 10 am- 2 pm
    • November 26 – December 1 from 12:30 pm – 4 pm  (Must pick up passes before 12/1 or be charged $20 )
    • December 2 through opening, Mon. – Fri. 9 am until 3:30 pm, Sundays 1pm – 4 pm
  • Rentals: JISP daily rentals are $120 for the season with no deposit required. If you desire to take rentals home, you will need to purchase a regular seasonal rental for $220 plus a $100 deposit. Students must come for a fitting.
  • Rental Fitting & Sizing Days @ Rentals 
    • November 25 – December 24 – Every day 8:30 am – 4:30 pm.
    • December 21/22 – Afternoon only 12 noon – 4:30 pm.
    • Fitting will not be available December 25 – January 1.
  • Late Fee: You must get fitted before your first day of rentals or you will be charged a late fee of $20. This includes scholarship students. If you have questions, contact rentals at (802) 824-5522 or rentals rentals@bromley.com.
  • Scholarships: Each school will be awarded up to two scholarships to allocate to their students.  Please see Scott Magrath for more information and an application. The application is due by October 29.
  • Adult Volunteers (always needed for the program to function)
    • JISP Instructors & Drivers: You must sign up and be a member of the Bromley Outing Club to instruct or drive. The cost is $50 for an individual and $75 for a  family.  To sign up as an instructor or driver, please go to https://bromleyoutingclub.sportngin.com/register/form/609215997
    • JISP Instructors: Earn one credit for each day of teaching! One credit equals one ticket mid-week and non-holiday Sundays. Two credits in exchange for Saturdays and all holiday periods. Two free Stratton days. Free skiing from 11 am until 1 pm and after your class on the day you teach. You do need to use a credit to ski on Bromley JISP Sundays.  You must commit to eight weeks of instruction.
    • JISP  Drivers: Drive three or more JISP students and receive a lift ticket for $15 on your JISP afternoon and $20 for Bromley Sundays. Shared drivers must share benefits, meaning only one can use the benefits on a given day at a time. Drivers can sign in as early as 11 am on their JISP day.
Questions?
Contact Mike Healy of the Bromley Outing Club at boc@bromleyoutingclub.com or Scott Magrath at smagrath@longtrailschool.org.

We write to inform you that LTS students have tested positive for COVID. We have completed contact tracing and notified any affected individuals. As always, students should stay home when sick, and watch for any symptoms of COVID, especially if a student is not vaccinated. If symptoms arise, please get tested without delay.

 

If you have contact with an individual who is positive for COVID-19, notify the LTS Health Team. If you or a family member test positive for COVID-19, notify the LTS Health Team. We are here to help.

This virus is persistent: we need to remain vigilant in our fight against it.

Your Health Team,

Stephenie, Scott and Katie

Dress Code Expectations

Long Trail School students have led a thoughtful and engaging schoolwide consideration of the theory, practice, and enforcement of an equitable dress code that fits this school community. We recently set forth the underlying Ten Principles. Now come the practical Dress Code Expectations. 

Expectation 1: Certain body parts must be covered by all students at all times.

  • Clothes must be worn such that genitals, buttocks, chests, and nipples are fully covered with opaque fabric at all times. All items listed as “must wear” in Expectation 2 must meet this basic Expectation 1.

Expectation 2: Students must wear (while following basic Expectation 1 above):

  • a shirt (with fabric in the front, back, straps over the shoulder and on the sides under the arms,), AND
  • pants/jeans or the equivalent (for example, a skirt, sweatpants, leggings, a dress or shorts), AND
  • shoes. 

Expectation 3: Students may not wear:

  • any outfit which, in whole or in part, a reasonable student in Southern Vermont would more likely wear to the beach or to bed. For example, as LTS does not have a pool, no swimsuits; also no pajamas and no short shorts.
  • violent language or reasonably offensive images.
  • images or language depicting/suggesting drugs, alcohol, vaping, or paraphernalia (or any illegal item or activity).
  • a bulletproof vest, body armor, tactical gear, or facsimile.
  • hate speech, profanity, or pornography.

Expectation 4: Dress Code enforcement

  • To ensure effective and equitable enforcement of this dress code, faculty members who feel a student violates the dress code will report their concerns to the School Counselor. 
  • The School Counselor will work with the student to resolve the circumstances. 
  • A student should not be shamed or required to display their body in front of others (students, parents, or staff) in school. “Shaming” includes but is not limited to: kneeling or bending over to check attire fit; measuring straps or skirt length; accusing students of “distracting” other students with their clothing.

This Dress Code applies to school days during school hours, including after-school activities or school-sponsored activities, unless there is an express exception, e.g., Pajama Day during Cabin Fever Week.

Students who feel they have been subject to discriminatory Dress Code enforcement should contact the Director of Student Life. 

The formulation of this Dress Code has benefitted from the organization and language of the Dress Code (accessed August 22, 2021) of the Wade Hampton High School in Greenville, SC.

https://www.longtrailschool.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/Long-Trail-School-is-still-thriving-_-Columnists-_-manchesterjournal.com_.pdf

Dear Long Trail Families,

On Tuesday, October 12, Long Trail will bring the 11th grade and a handful of 12th graders to a college fair at Saint Michael’s College in Colchester, VT.  This is the first open, in-person fair in the state in over two years and will provide access to over 120 colleges and universities.  After 18 months of virtual connections, I am excited for our students to meet face-to-face with college representatives.  The fair does have health precautions in place and masks will be required for all parts of the trip.

Students will have roughly 90 minutes to meet with representatives.  In order to provide this amount of time, we will need to leave campus by 7 am. Rutland area students will be picked up at 7:50 am at Michael’s (324 S Main St).  We will return to campus before 3 pm  and before the beginning of any after-school activities.  Students should dress nicely but comfortably for the trip.  We will eat lunch at the Saint Michael’s College dining hall (paid for by LTS) but students may still want to bring a snack and a water bottle for the ride.

In order to maximize students’ time at the fair, it is highly recommended that students register through this website (and watch the short video). I also encourage students to read this article on navigating a college fair.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Thank you,

Scott

Dear LTS Families:

One of our community members tested positive for COVID-19 today.  Contact tracing is complete, and any on-campus close contacts have been notified. 

This week marks our sixth week of the school year and our academics, athletics and arts endeavors are in full swing. Our community of families must work together to keep our students, faculty and families safe.  The most important guideline is to stay home when you feel sick, even if you think you can dismiss your symptoms as normal.  

If you have contact with an individual who is positive for COVID-19, notify the LTS Health Team. If you or a family member test positive for COVID-19, notify the LTS Health Team. We will help you to follow the quarantining and testing guidelines for close contacts.  Vaccinated close contacts do not have to be quarantined at home, but unvaccinated close contacts do.  Vaccination is the best protection against the virus, and thus the best way to avoid absences due to contracting or coming into contact with COVID-19.

Our core values of integrity and social responsibility will help to guide us through this new phase of the pandemic.  It is our goal to keep every student in school every day.  We need each family’s diligence, openness, and trust to accomplish that goal.  We’re all in this together!

Kindest Regards,

Your Health Team: Stephenie, Scott and Katie

Dear LTS Families:

Long Trail School is taking part in the 2021 Youth Risk Behavior Survey on October 14 (grades 8-12) or October 18 (grades 6 & 7). This survey was developed in 1991 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and is sponsored by the Vermont Department of Health and Agency of Education. The YRBS has been administered every other year in Vermont since 1993. The YRBS gathers information about health risk behaviors of 6th through 12th grade students. The survey will ask about nutrition, physical activity, injuries, sexual behaviors, tobacco, including vaping, alcohol, marijuana, and other drug use. Results from the YRBS help us determine the extent to which adolescents engage in or experience  health risk behaviors. The results from the YRBS support public health officials, educators, and community organization’s ability to assess and improve efforts to reduce health risk behaviors among adolescents throughout the state and nation. They help us develop and evaluate health-related programs and secure future funding. 

The YRBS is anonymous and survey procedures have been designed to protect your child’s privacy. Some students may find certain questions to be sensitive. However, students will not put their names on the survey and student login information is not recorded. Individual survey responses will not be divulged in a report of the results or disclosed to any school employee. 

For this survey to be accurate, it is important that all students, regardless of whether they have engaged in health-risk behaviors, are given an opportunity to participate in the survey. We would like all students to take part in the survey to best understand the issues and experiences of youth, however, the survey is voluntary. As a parent, you have the right to inspect the survey before it is administered and to opt your child out of participating in the survey. In addition, students may skip any questions they do not wish to answer or stop taking the survey at any point without penalty. A copy of the survey is available on the Vermont Department of Health YRBS webpage. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Long Trail’s Mental Health Counselor Meghan Karhan at (802) 867-5717 x277.

Please visit the Vermont Department of Health YRBS webpage for more information about the Vermont YRBS including previous reports. Links to the CDC’s YRBS page, FAQs, and other background information are available by clicking “Learn more about the YRBS” on the website. 

Should you decide to opt your child out of taking the survey, the attached form must be signed and returned two weeks prior to your child’s survey date: Sept. 30 for grades 8-12 and Oct. 4 for grades 6 & 7. 

Thank you for your cooperation.

Sincerely,

Meghan Karhan

Mental Health Counselor

Head of School Seth Linfield: I am delighted to share this week’s Head’s Corner with Grace P and Mackenzie S,  co-Presidents of our Student Council. Through the 2020-21 academic year, Long Trail School students led a thoughtful and engaging schoolwide conversation about the theory, practice, and enforcement of an equitable dress code that fits this school community. This week, we set forth the Ten Dress Code Principles. We are waiting a week to publish the operational details: even if you regard the specifics as too conservative or too liberal, we invite you to consider first the communal philosophy which has guided this effort.

Student Council Co-Presidents Grace P and Mackenzie S: Here at Long Trail, we value individualism and we encourage the student body and faculty members to express themselves with their dress. We acknowledge that a dress code can be an uncomfortable topic of discussion but LTS  encourages open dialogue about difficult subjects. As our community grows and society changes, we aim to adapt our dress code to fit those developments.

Dress Code Principles 

1. Students will dress appropriately for thinking and learning while on campus or representing the school.

2. Student choices should respect Long Trail School’s intent to sustain a diverse community.

3. All students may dress comfortably for school.

4. All students may engage in the educational environment without fear of or actual unnecessary discipline or body shaming.

5. LTS’s dress code does not reinforce stereotypes. LTS’s dress code treats all students equitably regardless of race, sex, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, ethnicity, religion, cultural observance, household income, or body type/size.

6. LTS recognizes higher-income students have more capacity to make choices and to enjoy variety in what they wear. The LTS dress code will seek to mitigate that inequity.

7. LTS will enforce the dress code consistently.

8. All students and staff are responsible for their own personal responses to someone else’s clothing.

9. School professionals will use student/body-positive language to explain the code and to address code violations.

10. LTS will maintain a safe learning environment in classes, activities, or events where protective or supportive clothing is needed, such as science lab courses (eye or body protection) or P.E. (athletic attire/shoes).

Dear Long Trail School Family,

We understand that an unsigned letter recently raised questions around the direction of Long Trail School (LTS). We want to address these questions openly and transparently and assure everyone in the LTS community that the school is thriving under Seth Linfield’s strong leadership.

We want to be exceedingly clear that we are proud and pleased with the record of our school under our Head of School Seth Linfield’s leadership, including: 

  • A solid track record of sending students to colleges that match and fit. Indeed, last year, 100% of IB candidates attained their Diploma and 90% of Seniors were admitted to their first or second choice colleges and universities. 
  • The completion of a strategic plan that included: teachers, students, parents, board members, administrators, and community members.
  • A steady climb of enrollment even before the Covid-19 influx.
  • A beautiful fieldhouse that was completed under budget and on time.
  • A financial turnaround from a large deficit four years ago to a sound and stable financial school that is in the black. Our monthly financial operations and statements are reviewed and prepared by outside accountants and the annual results are audited.
  • One of the few schools in Vermont that stayed open five days a week all year during COVID.

Last spring, as part of our strategic plan, the board hired an outside consultant with over 25 years of independent school leadership to assess our school’s performance and our Head of School. Evaluating the Head of School is a normal course of board business and is done for the benefit of the Head and the school. All discussions pertaining to the evaluation remain confidential; however, our board has been open about the process. The assessment was comprehensive and independent and the review included: 

  • Interviews with over 20 teachers and administrators
  • A net promoter survey of parents, teachers, and students at the end of the 20/21 school year 
  • Over 50 hours of discussions with the Head of School and the Board
  • Suggestions for the Head of School in areas that needed improvement

We are confident we have the right Head of School to lead LTS today and into the future.   

The spokesperson of the small group that has raised concerns has made it clear in their voluminous notes and emails to the school and our teachers that they do not share many of our Core Values and reject several of our school’s operating principles.  They reject recommended medical best practices to prevent COVID, actions which clearly helped us remain open all of last year. They demand that we stop teaching about race and racism and allege that we are “indoctrinating” our students about race. We are committed to social justice inside and outside our classrooms. They assail our evidence-based sexual health education. This curriculum helps our students develop healthier relationships, prevents dating violence, delays sexual initiation, and reduces unplanned pregnancy, HIV, and other STIs.

Their letter implies that our Board Chair and Head of School refused to meet about issues. This is false. In fact, over the summer, there were three separate meetings with the spokesperson.   

LTS thrives as a community because of our social commitments to one another grounded in our Core Values such as Kindness of Spirit and our Honor Code. We cherish free and open expression within our community. We develop the voice and agency of our students and readily encourage feedback from our constituents. That is how we improve. Equally important to free and open expression is civility, courtesy and respect. We teach and model civility, courtesy and respect to our students and would hope to see the same from all members of our community.

Our Best,

/signed/ Jim Anderson, Sue Bastian, Julie Foster, Tom Whalen, Amy Thebault, Andrea Ross, John Moser

 CC:   Seth Linfield, Head of School

Dear LTS Community:

Keeping our community safe and your children in school is our top priority.

For the 2021-22 school year, we are offering an extra layer of protection to mitigate the threat of COVID-19 in our school, our Community COVID-19 Testing Program. This program is free for students and staff, and participation in the program is highly encouraged, regardless of vaccination status. 

Students may only participate in the program with permission from a parent or guardian. 

To participate in this program, we kindly ask that you complete this online consent form on behalf of your child/ren. 

To learn more about this COVID-19 testing program, please visit the Agency of Education’s Covid-19 Testing Program Overview

Thanks again for your support! 

The LTS Health Team – Stephenie, Scott and Katie

Dear Families of Novice and Intermediate Spanish Classes,

We write to inform you about an exciting development in our teaching and learning of World Languages. Guided by our World Languages faculty, LTS has partnered with K12’s Middlebury Interactive Languages™ (MIL) to offer a Language Lab and dynamic streaming curriculum to all of our Novice world language sections. For the 2021-22 academic year, we intend to pilot this program at the Novice level in all three languages we currently offer at Long Trail.

For Spanish, our Novice and Intermediate Series students will take part in the Language Lab on their regular schedules. This will be an immersive language learning environment. These students will follow the curriculum with the guidance of Hanna Veysey, an in-class coach and personal face. Hanna will work under the active direction of our World Languages chair, Kileen Adler, and our Upper School Spanish teacher, Dr. Kelley Swarthout. Hanna will monitor the daily progress of our enrolled students and provide them with live support. Hanna is not a Spanish teacher and will learn alongside our students to better understand what it is like to be in their shoes. A dedicated Spanish-language instructor will provide additional assessment and feedback virtually as part of the MIL learning experience. Our French and German instructors (François Sécordel and Kileen Adler, respectively) will incorporate the same MIL curriculum into their Novice 1 classes.

LTS will continue to actively search for an outstanding novice Spanish teacher. “Necessity is the mother of invention (Richard Franck, Northern Memoirs (1658)).” Had we not met challenges in securing a second Spanish language teacher, we might still be deliberating when to license the Middlebury program. We have now enthusiastically elected to do so; even though the total cost of this program annually is greater than the cost of hiring a traditional teacher, the investment in our students’ learning is worth it. MIL instruction aligns with our own World Languages Department’s ACTFL standards (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages.)  Augmented instruction will allow us to further our IB goal of global mindedness. MIL also opens the prospect of empowering students with a full range of differentiated activities for language acquisition in grades 6-12.

If you have additional questions about your child’s Spanish language class, please direct them to Department Chair Kileen Adler or Upper School Spanish language teacher Dr. Kelley Swarthout. My happy role is to introduce the concept and thank you for your continuing trust.

Stay safe, kind, and hopeful,

/s/ Seth Linfield

Head of School

CC: Dean Mary Ellen Mega, Chair Kileen Adler, François Sécordel, Dr. Kelley Swarthout, Hanna Veysey

Dear LTS Families:

It has been wonderful to see our classrooms come alive with teaching and learning these past two weeks!  Our enthusiastic student-athletes are training hard, and the Girls Varsity soccer team will open the LTS fall season on Saturday with a game at West Rutland at 11:00.  Our after-school drama program has begun planning for the fall musical, The Old Man and the Old Moon.

We write to you today to report our COVID vaccination percentages and to update you on LTS’ masking policy.

As of September 1, 87% of our community members who are eligible have chosen to vaccinate, and 75% of our entire community, including those ineligible, are vaccinated.  All of our professionals are vaccinated.

Based on guidance from numerous medical, scientific, and public health resources, we will continue universal mask wearing until further notice.  

We frequently assess all of our health and safety policies. When we reach 80% vaccination across the entire community, we will let you know – which is not to predict that there will be any particular change in masking policy at that point. 

Our shared values of integrity and social responsibility are honored when we take care of each other.  The best way to keep our community safe and healthy is to vaccinate and to stay home when we are sick.  In addition, it is imperative that anyone who comes into contact with a COVID-positive individual both inform Stephenie Frawley, our School Nurse, without delay (sfrawley@longtrailschool.org; 802.867.5717 x107) and follow the relevant guidance which differs if you are vaccinated or unvaccinated.  For a comprehensive and clear decision tree from the UVM Children’s Hospital on when to stay home, please refer to the K-12 Evaluation Chart.  

We wish you a restful and joyful Labor Day weekend!

Your LTS Health Team: Stephenie, Scott and Katie.

We are now on the eve of a four-day Labor Day weekend. As we pause to celebrate American workers and prepare to welcome fall, this is an opportune time to explain how we set our calendar.

The calendar process is highly participatory and includes a wide swath of considerations from many stakeholders. We look at an exhaustive range of factors:

  • Creating a small cushion for snow or other emergency closings to still meet Vermont’s requirements
  • Meeting International Baccalaureate demands for minimum instructional hours that LTS must offer before the IB exams in early May
  • Lessening summer learning loss
  • Reviewing concepts and prior learning as the school year begins
  • Anchoring teacher professional development days
  • Coordinating experiential learning
  • Fostering opportunities to go into more depth later within the curriculum
  • Arranging interscholastic sports
  • Establishing dates and opportunities for field trips and excursions
  • Setting parent conferences at a beneficial time of year
  • Balancing semesters
  • Lengthening breaks, and
  • Integrating family vacations.

Two other aspects impact Long Trail School. First, as mentioned, the IB and AP exams are in early May, so adding days afterward is of little utility for students or faculty in those courses. As most of our faculty teach across grades, the IB and AP clocks affect all students. Second, if circumstances were to force us to learn virtually, the more time together that our students enjoyed in-person before that happened, the better their learning outcomes would be. In the future, we may start the school year a touch later than we did this year.

Stay safe, and we will see you after Labor Day!

For our Jewish students, faculty, families, and friends, Shanah Tovah: have a happy and healthy New Year!

Stay safe, kind, and hopeful,

/s/ Seth Linfield

Head of School

Dear LTS Community:

Tomorrow, Friday, August 27, 2021 will be a Head’s Holiday with no classes and no athletics practices.  

Due to everyone going all in, we have surpassed our orientation goals, setting us up for a compelling year of learning, teaching and personal growth. It’s time for all of us to refresh from the heat and humidity of this week.  On Monday, we will plunge into our academic schedule with full-length classes, and for lunch we will enjoy a complimentary cook-out for the LTS community.  

To avoid any hardship to any family, LTS is pleased to offer supervision for students at school tomorrow anytime between 7:30 am and 3:00 pm.  Students should bring lunch and LTS will provide drinks and snacks. Buses will not be running.

We hope that this extra day of rest this weekend will be rejuvenating as we continue through  this special new school year.  

Thank you,
Seth Linfield, Head of School

Dear 6th and 7th Grade Families,

Welcome to the new school year! The middle school team is more than excited to see our returning students as well as the many new faces that will soon be in our classrooms. We are reaching out with a few policies and guidelines that will be relevant to your 6th and 7th graders.

We are asking that all guardians and their children fill out the form at this link. It has a few questions to help us better understand your child and gives an opportunity for you to share any relevant information. There is no “due date”, but we ask they be filled out as soon as it is convenient for you.

To start the school year well, here are a few supply requests:

  • English: Students will need a notebook/journal dedicated to their English class.
  • Science: Students will need a one subject notebook with at least 140 pages for exclusive use in science class.
  • Physical Education: Students will need to bring shorts or sweatpants, athletic shoes and a t-shirt to their P.E. class. A bag to keep them together is recommended.

This year we will also see the introduction of specific universal policies for the 6th and 7th grade that will be reviewed during our first week in school.

  • Cell phone policy: To keep it simple, our rule is that cell phones must remain in a student’s bag at all times at school. Cell phones can only be used in class when directed by an instructor. If a parent needs to contact their child, please call the front desk and they can pass on any necessary information. The front desk number is 802-867-5717 x178.
  • Late work policy: Late homework must be completed by the next scheduled class after the due date with a 10% reduction in score. Any assignments not turned in by that next class will receive a zero. Projects will lose 10% for each class that it is late.
  • Work missed due to absence: If your child misses school due to illness, they need to meet with their teachers to discuss a plan for the missed work. If no meeting occurs, they will have as many days as they missed to make up the work.
  • Work missed due to planned absence: if your child has a planned absence, the child must communicate with their teachers to make a plan for missed work. If they do not communicate in advance, all work will be required to be submitted when your child returns to school. The PLANNED ABSENCE FORM needs to be completed and returned to the front desk before any planned absence.

We wish to encourage students to advocate for themselves and take initiative in communicating with their teachers. 

Our middle school team strives to provide an engaging and rich environment for your child, while supporting self-reliance and encouraging exploration of our environment. One fun aspect of our program is the opportunity for off-campus experiences and learning. On Tuesday, September 7 we will have our first off-campus trip. Students will be hiking to Dorset’s Cutler Memorial Forest for activities and a picnic. They will need a packed lunch, appropriate outdoor clothing, a water bottle and sunscreen. As the day approaches, we will give more reminders to the students, but your help is greatly appreciated to make sure they are prepared.

This can feel like a big transition for your children, but we are here to make it as smooth, engaging, and fun as possible. Feel free to reach out to any of the middle school teachers if you have questions. 

 

Thank you for your continued support.

 

Sincerely,

The Middle School Team

Sean Dempsey, Science

Renee Lewin, English

Kate Pierce, Social Studies

Joshua Vann, Math

John Schneble, Physical Education

Dear Long Trail School Family,

We are eager to see our students when they return to campus on Monday, August 23.

As your LTS health team, our aim is to help your child(ren) stay safe and to enable our school to be open full-time offering LTS teaching and learning every day of this school year.  There will undoubtedly be cases and clusters of COVID-19 around us.  Still, with your partnership, we will not merely persevere but thrive, as we did last year.

The LTS Health Team will continue to oversee our health, safety and prevention operations.  Our School Nurse, Stephenie Frawley, is returning full-time this year, with a complementary role coordinating Student Life.  Scott Magrath serves as our Health Officer and Katie Redding as our Health Communicator.

High rates of vaccination are our best defense in the fight against this changing virus.  Vaccines are very effective at preventing infection and extremely effective in preventing hospitalization and death.  Vermont has achieved one of the highest vaccination rates in the world.

Determining our community-wide vaccination rate is essential to planning our way forward. If you have not already done so, please complete the required vaccine reporting form.  Until you complete the form, we will deem your student(s) unvaccinated, which may have implications for your child and the whole community.

In determining rules of conduct, LTS carefully weighs guidance from the VT Dept. of Education and the VT Dept. of Health, among other authorities, and then determines what fits our school community under all the facts and circumstances. In this light, we commend to your attention the COVID-19 Prevention Measures for Fall 2021 recently released by Secretary French and Dr. Levine.

LTS’s Opening Policies will be:

  • The 2021-22 Health Pledge will be signed by all community members.

  • Masks will be required for everyone indoors for two weeks, or until Labor Day weekend.  Masks are required on buses, regardless of the rider’s vaccination status.  Masks are not required outdoors. After the first two weeks of school, we will revisit mask rules.

  • Stay Home When Sick.  We are all relying on every student and professional to stay home (and inform your doctor) if you show any symptoms of COVID-19.  In addition, we need to stay home when we have come in close contact with someone who has COVID-19.  For a comprehensive and clear decision tree from the UVM Children’s Hospital on when to stay home, please refer to the K-12 Evaluation Chart.

  • Testing will be regularly offered to all and may be required for some.

  • Visitors who can show full vaccination will be allowed inside school buildings.

  • Cleaning protocols implemented last year will continue in classrooms and on buses.

  • Ventilation will be enhanced with open windows allowing fresh air into classrooms, and outdoor learning will be leveraged whenever possible.  We are fortunate that our filtration and ventilation systems were upgraded last summer.

 We can all help each other safely navigate through our school days by working together and honoring our core values of kindness, openness, integrity, stewardship and social responsibility.

Thank you for your participation and trust.  We can’t wait to see you on campus!

Kindest Regards,

Stephenie Frawley, Scott Magrath, Katie Redding, and Seth Linfield

The best way to keep students safe and healthy – and to ensure a smooth return to full, in person learning – is to make sure they are vaccinated if they are age 12 or older. The vaccines are safe and highly effective at preventing the most serious effects of COVID-19, including against the Delta variant. The sooner your students get a first dose, the sooner they will be closer to full vaccine protection.

A full list of clinics, clinic hours and registration information can be found at healthvermont.gov/MyVaccine

If you are not seeing a clinic scheduled in your area yet; please be aware that we are working to confirm and schedule additional clinics. We will continue to send an updated list with additional dates as they are confirmed. Vaccine will also be available at pharmacies and other community locations around Vermont.


Saturday, August 14 

  • Essex North SU, Canaan High School, 99 School Street, Canaan, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • Grand Isle SU, Grand Isle Elementary School, 224 U.S. Route 2, Grand Isle, 2 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Sunday, August 15 

  • Barre UUSD, Spaulding High School, 155 Ayers Street, Barre, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Orleans Central SU, Lake Region Union High School, 317 Lake Region Road, Orleans, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Monday, August 16

  • Burlington SD, Edmunds Middle School, 275 Main Street, Burlington, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Windham Southeast SU, Academy School, 860 Western Avenue, Brattleboro, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Tuesday, August 17

  • Hartford SD, Hartford High School, 37 Highland Avenue, White River Junction. 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • Milton Town SD, Milton Elementary School, 45 Herrick Avenue, Milton, 4 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Wednesday, August 18

  • Mount Mansfield Unified Union SD, Mount Mansfield High School, 211 Browns Trace Road, Jericho, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Colchester SD, Colchester Middle School, 425 Blakely Road, Colchester, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Thursday, August 19

  • Essex Westford Education Community Unified Union SD, Essex High School, 2 Educational Drive, Essex Junction, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Rutland City SD, Rutland High School, 22 Stratton Road, Rutland, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Friday, August 20

  • Mount Abraham Unified SD, Mount Abraham Union High School, 220 Airport Drive, Bristol, 2 p.m. – 8 p.m.
  • Windham Northeast SU, Bellows Falls Union High School, 406 High School Road, Westminster, 2 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Sunday, August 22

  • Southwest Vermont SU, Molly Stark Elementary, 181 Orchard Street, Bennington, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Monday, August 23

  • Orange Southwest Unified Union SD, Randolph Union High School, 15 Forest Street. Randolph, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Windsor Central SU, Woodstock Union Middle/High School, 100 Amsden Way, Woodstock, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Tuesday, August 24

  • Green Mountain Tech Center, 738 VT-15, Hyde Park, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Wednesday, August 25

  • Windham Southeast SU, Brattleboro Union High School, 131 Fairground Road, Brattleboro, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Orange East SU, Oxbow High School, 36 Oxbow Drive, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Thursday, August 26

  • Franklin West SU, Bellows Free Academy, 75 Hunt Street, Fairfax, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • South Burlington SD, South Burlington High School, 550 Dorset Street, South Burlington, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Friday, August 27

  • Addison Central SD, Middlebury High School, 73 Charles Avenue, Middlebury, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Orange East SU, Blue Mountain High School, 2420 US-302, Wells River, 2 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Saturday, August 28

  • St. Johnsbury Academy, 1000 Main Street, St. Johnsbury, 12 p.m. – 4 p.m.
  • Franklin Northeast SU, Richford Junior/Senior High School, 1 Corliss Heights, Richford, 2 p.m. – 8 p.m.
  • (UPDATED) Washington Central Unified Union SD, U32 High School, 930 Gallison Hill Road, Montpelier, 2:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Sunday, August 29

  • Harwood Unified Union SD, Crossett Brook Middle School, 5672 VT-100, Duxbury, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Addison Northwest SD, Vergennes High School, 50 Monkton Road, Vergennes, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Monday, August 30

  • Missisquoi Valley SD, Missisquoi Valley Union High School, 175 Thunderbird Drive, Swanton, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Slate Valley Unified Union SD, Fair Haven High School, 33 Mechanic Street, Fair Haven, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Springfield SD, Springfield High School, 303 South Street, Springfield, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Tuesday, August 31

  • Orleans Southwest SU, Hazen Union High School, 126 Hazen Union Drive, Hardwick, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Bennington-Rutland SU, Manchester Elementary, 80 Memorial Avenue, Manchester Center, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • (NEW) Springfield SD, Springfield High School, 303 South Street, Springfield, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Wednesday, September 1

  • Maple Run Unified School District, St. Albans Elementary School, 29 Bellows Street, St. Albans, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Thursday, September 2

  • North Country SU, North Country High School, 57 Junior High Drive, Derby Center, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • Burr and Burton Academy, 57 Seminary Avenue, Manchester, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Friday, September 3

  • Lamoille South Unified Union SD, Morristown Elementary, 548 Park Street, Morristown, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Champlain Valley SD, Champlain Valley Union High School, 369 CVU Road, Hinesburg, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Saturday, September 4

  • Essex North SU, Canaan High School, 99 School Street, Canaan, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • Grand Isle SU, Grand Isle Elementary School, 224 U.S. Route 2, Grand Isle, 2 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Sunday, September 5

  • Barre UUSD, Spaulding High School, 155 Ayers Street, Barre, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Orleans Central SU, Lake Region Union High School, 317 Lake Region Road, Orleans, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Monday, September 6

  • Burlington SD, Edmunds Middle School, 275 Main Street, Burlington, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Windham Southeast SU, Academy School, 860 Western Avenue, Brattleboro, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Tuesday, September 7

  • Hartford SD, Hartford High School, 37 Highland Avenue, White River Junction. 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • Milton Town SD, Milton Elementary School, 45 Herrick Avenue, Milton, 4 p.m. – 8 p.m.
  • Montpelier Roxbury SD, Montpelier High School, 5 High School Drive, Montpelier, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Wednesday, September 8

  • Windham Southwest SU, Twin Valley Middle and High School, 4299 VT Route 100, Whitingham, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Mount Mansfield Unified Union SD, Mount Mansfield High School, 211 Browns Trace Road, Jericho, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Colchester SD, Colchester Middle School, 425 Blakely Road, Colchester, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Thursday, September 9

  • Essex Westford Education Community Unified Union SD, Essex High School, 2 Educational Drive, Essex Junction, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Rutland City SD, Rutland High School, 22 Stratton Road, Rutland, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Friday, September 10

  • Mount Abraham Unified SD, Mount Abraham Union High School, 220 Airport Drive, Bristol, 2 p.m. – 8 p.m.
  • Windham Northeast SU, Bellows Falls Union High School, 406 High School Road, Westminster, 2 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Sunday, September 12

  • Southwest Vermont SU, Molly Stark Elementary, 181 Orchard Street, Bennington, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Monday, September 13

  • Orange Southwest Unified Union SD, Randolph Union High School, 15 Forest Street. Randolph, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Windsor Central SU, Woodstock Union Middle/High School, 100 Amsden Way, Woodstock, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Tuesday, September 14

  • Green Mountain Tech Center, 738 VT-15, Hyde Park, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Wednesday, September 15

  • Windham Southeast SU, Brattleboro Union High School, 131 Fairground Road, Brattleboro, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Orange East SU, Oxbow High School, 36 Oxbow Drive, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Thursday, September 16

  • Franklin West SU, Bellows Free Academy, 75 Hunt Street, Fairfax, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • South Burlington SD, South Burlington High School, 550 Dorset Street, South Burlington, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Friday, September 17

  • Addison Central SD, Middlebury High School, 73 Charles Avenue, Middlebury, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Orange East SU, Blue Mountain High School, 2420 US-302, Wells River, 2 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Saturday, September 18

  • St. Johnsbury Academy, 1000 Main Street, St. Johnsbury, 12 p.m. – 4 p.m.
  • Franklin Northeast SU, Richford Junior/Senior High School, 1 Corliss Heights, Richford, 2 p.m. – 8 p.m.
  • (UPDATED) Washington Central Unified Union SD, U32 High School, 930 Gallison Hill Road, Montpelier, 2:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Sunday, September 19

  • Harwood Unified Union SD, Crossett Brook Middle School, 5672 VT-100, Duxbury, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Addison Northwest SD, Vergennes High School, 50 Monkton Road, Vergennes, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Monday, September 20

  • Missisquoi Valley SD, Missisquoi Valley Union High School, 175 Thunderbird Drive, Swanton, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Slate Valley Unified Union SD, Fair Haven High School, 33 Mechanic Street, Fair Haven, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Tuesday, September 21

  • Orleans Southwest SU, Hazen Union High School, 126 Hazen Union Drive, Hardwick, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Bennington-Rutland SU, Manchester Elementary, 80 Memorial Avenue, Manchester Center, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Wednesday, September 22

  • Maple Run Unified School District, St. Albans Elementary School, 29 Bellows Street, St. Albans, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Windham Southwest SU, Twin Valley Middle and High School, 4299 VT Route 100, Whitingham, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Thursday, September 23

  • North Country SU, North Country High School, 57 Junior High Drive, Derby Center, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • Burr and Burton Academy, 57 Seminary Avenue, Manchester, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Friday, September 24

  • Lamoille South Unified Union SD, Morristown Elementary, 548 Park Street, Morristown, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Champlain Valley SD, Champlain Valley Union High School, 369 CVU Road, Hinesburg, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • (NEW) Springfield SD, Springfield High School, 303 South Street, Springfield, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Saturday, September 25

  • Essex North SU, Canaan High School, 99 School Street, Canaan, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • Grand Isle SU, Grand Isle Elementary School, 224 U.S. Route 2, Grand Isle, 2 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Sunday, September 26

  • Barre UUSD, Spaulding High School, 155 Ayers Street, Barre, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Orleans Central SU, Lake Region Union High School, 317 Lake Region Road, Orleans, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Monday, September 27

  • Burlington SD, Edmunds Middle School, 275 Main Street, Burlington, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Windham Southeast SU, Academy School, 860 Western Avenue, Brattleboro, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Tuesday, September 28

  • Hartford SD, Hartford High School, 37 Highland Avenue, White River Junction. 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • Milton Town SD, Milton Elementary School, 45 Herrick Avenue, Milton, 4 p.m. – 8 p.m.
  • Montpelier Roxbury SD, Montpelier High School, 5 High School Drive, Montpelier, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Wednesday, September 29

  • Mount Mansfield Unified Union SD, Mount Mansfield High School, 211 Browns Trace Road, Jericho, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Colchester SD, Colchester Middle School, 425 Blakely Road, Colchester, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Thursday, September 30

  • Essex Westford Education Community Unified Union SD, Essex High School, 2 Educational Drive, Essex Junction, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Rutland City SD, Rutland High School, 22 Stratton Road, Rutland, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Friday, October 1

  • Mount Abraham Unified SD, Mount Abraham Union High School, 220 Airport Drive, Bristol, 2 p.m. – 8 p.m.
  • Windham Northeast SU, Bellows Falls Union High School, 406 High School Road, Westminster, 2 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Sunday, October 3

  • Southwest Vermont SU, Molly Stark Elementary, 181 Orchard Street, Bennington, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Monday, October 4

  • Orange Southwest Unified Union SD, Randolph Union High School, 15 Forest Street. Randolph, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Windsor Central SU, Woodstock Union Middle/High School, 100 Amsden Way, Woodstock, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Springfield SD, Springfield High School, 303 South Street, Springfield, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Tuesday, October 5

  • Green Mountain Tech Center, 738 VT-15, Hyde Park, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Wednesday, October 6

  • Windham Southeast SU, Brattleboro Union High School, 131 Fairground Road, Brattleboro, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Orange East SU, Oxbow High School, 36 Oxbow Drive, Bradford, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • St. Johnsbury SD, St. Johnsbury School, 257 Western Avenue, St. Johnsbury, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Thursday, October 7

  • Franklin West SU, Bellows Free Academy, 75 Hunt Street, Fairfax, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • South Burlington SD, South Burlington High School, 550 Dorset Street, South Burlington, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Friday, October 8

  • Addison Central SD, Middlebury High School, 73 Charles Avenue, Middlebury, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Orange East SU, Blue Mountain High School, 2420 US-302, Wells River, 2 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Saturday, October 9

  • St. Johnsbury Academy, 1000 Main Street, St. Johnsbury, 12 p.m. – 4 p.m.
  • Franklin Northeast SU, Richford Junior/Senior High School, 1 Corliss Heights, Richford, 2 p.m. – 8 p.m.
  • (UPDATED) Washington Central Unified Union SD, U32 High School, 930 Gallison Hill Road, Montpelier, 2 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Monday, October 11

  • Missisquoi Valley SD, Missisquoi Valley Union High School, 175 Thunderbird Drive, Swanton, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Welcome back, Mountain Lions!

There is no space lonelier than a school without students. Next week happily brings the buoyant sounds of Fall sports conditioning and our inaugural event for 6th- and 7th-grade families of the reimagined Parents’ Network. 

This upcoming school year promises an exquisite synthesis of hope and expectation, tinted by a recognition that the pandemic continues to evolve. Last year, LTS was one of the rare schools offering Middle and High School programs that was open continuously for all interested students. Together, we advanced our commitments to social justice and inclusion and reasoned political discourse.. These reservoirs of adaptability, resilience, and communal care that we conscientiously cultivated will serve as a wellspring for this new year and beyond.

We open with a record enrollment of 240, having increased our student population by 33% over the past four years. For every student, the individual possibilities continue to soar. In future communications, we will share initiatives in outdoor education; music, the arts and culture; internships; and mental health – while we invest in signature programs, including International Baccalaureate courses and Fieldhouse Athletics.

We will also continue our strategic and facilities planning, as we seek to sustain our success and make LTS an enduring school of choice for students, faculty, and families. Many of you have already advanced this endeavor by sharing your time and wisdom, for which we are grateful–and we need you even more now. 

At LTS, we best inspire and develop lifelong thinkers for a bright tomorrow when we engage together. That is how we embolden our students to approach what is and dream of what can be with a sense of wonder. Thank you for taking the next steps of this journey in the school year coming upon us.

Stay safe, kind, and hopeful,

/s/ Seth Linfield

Head of School

Dear Long Trail Class of 2022 and Parents, 

Welcome to the first of many letters and emails from me this year (and congratulations on receiving your first communication recognizing your exalted status as a Long Trail Senior)! As we enter August, there are some important steps to take in the coming weeks regarding college. 

I truly hope you and your family are doing well and that you had a good summer discovering new talents and local places to explore. I am excited to get the year going so I want to get right to the point.   As much as things in college admissions have changed in the last year, many of the steps required in the college application process remain the same. As we are getting close to the start of school, there are some especially important steps to take in the coming weeks regarding the college search process. Following these 10 steps will allow us to hit the ground running when classes begin. (For a quick laugh, check out this video on why there are Ten, and not Fifteen, Commandments. The same thing happened to these Fifteen Ten Steps)  

10 STEPS TO COLLEGE FOR THE CLASS OF 2022

1.  Campus Visits: Campus visits are extremely important and helpful but this is definitely an area that is going to look very different than years before.  Many campuses, especially in the Northeast, are resuming in-person tours again while continuing to offer the virtual options created over the last year.  I will be the first to say that an online tour is not a great substitute for a good old fashioned campus visit. However, these online options still do allow for a meaningful connection and, most importantly, have also removed the barriers of distance, time, and cost. The upside is that you can now probably have more interactions with colleges than ever before! 

I have been really happy to hear how many of you are visiting campuses (physically and virtually) this summer!  As those who have done so can attest, a visit really does  help you understand what a college or university is all about: the good, the bad and everything in between. It is important to also keep in mind that many, but certainly not all, colleges track these interactions as “demonstrated interest” so your attendance will not just inform you but also MAY give your application a (very) slight advantage.

Please use these next few weeks to make these connections. If at all possible, avoid starting your visits in the fall. Between Long Trail’s busy academic schedules, homework, ACT and SAT testing, and college application deadlines that are earlier each year, beginning to look at schools in the fall will not give you the time to properly search for and apply to schools. This is the #1 piece of advice from students and parents recently completing the college process–do not put off visits. If you liked a college or university you saw earlier this spring or  summer, then I recommend reconnecting with them again.   

Finally, Long Trail has hosted an average of 75 colleges and universities the last few years. Last year, Long Trail saw over 100 virtual visits!  We already have several visits booked for this fall–both virtual and in-person.  This will be another great way to connect with colleges and universities, especially those institutions that may be too far away. You will be able to see the calendar of visits in your SCOIR account (remember there is the SCOIR app as well).

2. Testing: The main portions of the SAT and ACT tests will very much look like they have the last few years. The biggest difference is that a large portion (over 600) of colleges and universities, such UVM or Cornell, are not requiring these tests for admission this year, joining a group of already over 1000 colleges and universities that have already been test optional (making a total of 1600 institutions, about 66% of all four year institutions).  A student can apply to several excellent colleges or universities without needing to take these tests. You can certainly apply to these colleges without taking a test but there are many who question how “optional” is test optional or feel that having a score could be beneficial.  This article (and the source) helps shed some light on this debate.  Several members of the Class of 2021 went the test optional route and many (but certainly not all) of them received positive decisions.

If you are going to test, students should plan on taking the ACT and/or SAT at least once this fall and early winter.  Long Trail will resume being a national SAT test center (open to all students).  We will offer the SAT on the following four Saturdays:

August 28, October 2, November 6, and December 4. We will also be offering one SAT School Day test on October 13.  Long Trail is not an ACT test center but there have traditionally been other local schools that host this test. You should be able to find a seat in the Bennington, Manchester, or Rutland areas. The registration deadline for the first ACT is August 6. LTS will offer one in-school ACT test in mid-October (exact date is TBD). As a reminder, I will register you for any in-school testing. YOU need to register for any of the Saturday testing dates. I cannot do it for you! You should already have accounts with the SAT and ACT (use the forget password function) but if you do not, then you can just create one for free. Do not create duplicate accounts!

Students applying early action or early decision have the August, September, and October test administrations as viable options.  Scores from the November dates may not arrive in time to meet some early deadlines so it is important to check with your colleges’ testing policies and plan accordingly. 

The College Board thankfully eliminated both the Essay section of the SAT and the Subject Tests earlier this year.  You no longer need to fret, stress, or strategize over these defunct testing requirements. The ACT is currently still offering the additional essay.  This optional step will also likely become extinct in the near future.  Until then: You do not need to take the ACT essay!

If you are going to take these tests then test preparation makes a difference! I strongly encourage students to practice for these tests. With a free account, students have access to online test prep through Khan Academy and the ACT.  

It will be up to you to decide which route is best for you but know that I am here to help. Please contact me if you would like a more individualized testing, or not testing, plan.

3. Website and Google Classroom: My website is a helpful resource. It is being enhanced and updated for 2021-22, and I will continue to add information, articles and other websites throughout the year. I welcome contributions and suggestions. My new Google Classroom is a great source for current college events, webinars, news, programs, and scholarships.  The class code is ocuaekq.  The Google Classroom for the Seniors of 2022 is now up and running.  The class code is laxa5hk

4. Letters of recommendation: Most colleges require one recommendation from a counselor (me) and 1-2 recommendations from an academic teacher. These letters play an important role in the application process so you should give a decent amount of thought to which teacher(s) you ask. The teacher should, in most cases, be from one of your 11th or 12th grade core/academic classes (potential art, music, and theater majors could use their art, music, or theater teacher). These 2-3 letters should provide more than enough information. More is NOT better. Any additional recommendations, academic or non-academic (employer, coach, clergy), should be sent only if requested by a college.  As the director of college counseling, I will write letters for all students and can plan accordingly. Many of you made arrangements with your teachers before leaving for summer but the final deadline to make recommendation requests/changes and submit the form to me will be Monday, September 6.  Arrangements made after this date could result in the letters not being ready by an application deadline! Lastly, you will need to finalize your request through SCOIR and I can help with that simple step when school starts.

5. Resumes and the senior survey: Please send me or share a copy of your updated resume or a list of your accomplishments and participation (jobs, sports, awards), if you didn’t already from last year’s class. In a separate email/shared document that will arrive shortly, you will receive your senior survey.  The resume and survey help me and other recommendation writers have a complete picture about you as an individual and as a student. These should be completed by Monday, September 13. 

6. Applications and essays: We will be using the  Common Application to submit most applications and essays combined with SCOIR to submit and track supporting documents (transcripts, letters of rec, etc). With their web based service and the SCOIR student app, I think you are going to really enjoy using SCOIR. Here is video to give you an overview.  To be able to submit applications, you will need to create an account with the Common Application.  Once you create a free account, you will be assigned a ID# that you will need for your SCOIR account. We will go over these steps in our first few classes but here is a video and slideshow to explain these steps.

Writing samples/essays are a very important piece of the application, especially as colleges move away from the essay section on the ACT and SAT. Students should anticipate writing at least one longer essay (250-650 words) and possibly some shorter ones (1-2 paragraphs). There will be a section where you can discuss the impact of COVID on your education and life. Take your time, write a couple of drafts and have your writing proofread by someone who knows you. The writing samples must be completed by October 15.  In addition to dedicated time in your college counseling class this fall, Long Trail will also offer essay writing workshops in August and September. My advice is to start writing NOW!  To help get started, Long Trail will host an Essay Night on Thursday, August 12 at 6:30 PM (link will be sent out that week). Finally, at a recent conference, a dean of admission at a selective college said that students should devote a good amount of time, thought, and energy to the short answer questions in the application supplements. She said that colleges are paying a lot more attention to these shorter writing samples. You can find the essay prompts here.

 7. Application deadlines: To give me time to compile the necessary supporting documents for an application, I must be informed of a student’s intent to submit an application at least two weeks in advance. The first application deadline will be November 1 followed by several more in November and December.  For applications due January 1, the deadline will be one week before the start of the winter holiday vacation. Any application material requests submitted to me after these windows cannot be guaranteed to be fulfilled in time, which could jeopardize your chances of admission. The toughest aspect to the application process is getting started. The more you do now, the less you will have to do later….when you have games/meets, homework, rehearsals, etc.

8. College and Financial Aid Nights: To help students get the best start to their senior year, we will hold Senior College Night early this year. It will be on September 15 following the NHS Induction.  More details and the meeting code will follow as school begins.

9. Summer meetings: With its slightly less hectic pace, summer has proven to be a great time to discuss college. I met with several parents and students this summer via Meet, Zoom, or the phone. I have more meetings scheduled for August but also have some openings, Monday through Friday, to connect with parents and students to review progress and strategize about upcoming steps. I also performed mock interviews with students to help them feel more comfortable and confident in the interview process. If you would like to schedule a meeting, or even time to talk on the phone, please call me on my cell at 610-955-2463, use this scheduling link, or email me at smagrath@longtrailschool.org.

10. Have fun: Senior year is special. With all you have been through, your senior year is going to be extra special and memorable.  I want you to have fun (but still work hard) in your final year of high school and I hope you are excited about the amazing opportunities awaiting you next fall.

Looking forward to a great year, 

Scott Magrath

Dear LTS Family,

Long Trail School seeks to continue our excellent health and safety record on COVID-19. We will continue to prioritize the health, safety and well-being of all campus community members to take part in the vitality of our school, including students who are still too young to receive a vaccine and those who are immunocompromised and rely upon herd immunity. 

Reporting Vaccine Status for 2021-22:

We strongly encourage our eligible students to get the vaccine. LTS may require a student who is not vaccinated to wear a mask indoors or take other actions, such as participation in ongoing testing.  To plan for next fall, we need to know how many of our community members are fully vaccinated. For now, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson vaccines under Emergency Use Authorization. While this Emergency Use Authorization continues, we require that all parents and guardians of students 12 and older provide proof of vaccination to School Nurse Stephenie Frawley, or inform her of your decision not to vaccinate your child by completing this electronic form.  For families with multiple children attending LTS, please complete a separate form for each child.  

Anticipated Vaccine Requirement for 2022-23:

Once the FDA grants permanent approval for any of the COVID-19 vaccines, we expect to include the COVID-19 vaccine among the LTS required vaccinations for all eligible students by the later option of (a) the start of the 2022-23 academic year or (b) 60 days after full approval. LTS will then only accommodate students who cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons. Briefly, a medical exemption must be set forth in writing by a board-certified physician explaining that a particular immunization is detrimental to a child’s health. Please contact LTS School Nurse Stephenie Frawley for more information on the medical exemption. There will be no religious or philosophical exemption. 

Why Vaccines Matter:

At Long Trail School, we inspire and develop lifelong thinkers for a bright tomorrow. Everyone being together on campus in the fall will allow us to engage fully with our LTS values of Integrity, Kindness, Openness, Social Responsibility, and Stewardship. What LTS does best – inside and outside our classrooms, labs, and studios, on our playing fields, and off-campus on trips and in social, cultural, and service activities – depends upon personal relationships in close proximity. Vaccines will play a critical role in empowering our students to flourish. 

With vaccines available to everyone 12 and over, Vermont’s pandemic responses have led the nation in many ways. As Vermont has been in the forefront, it is not overly boastful to say that LTS has led Vermont: thanks to our outstanding faculty and you, we offered live instruction five days per week to all students this year while providing simultaneous hyflex ABBA distance learning.

Our work together in assuring our community’s health and safety is not done. Vaccines mitigate risk and protect each other’s health within our student-centered culture. Thank you, as always, for continuing to do your part – and for trusting us.

So looking forward to seeing you soon, 

 /s/ Seth Linfield

Head of School

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